Category Archives: News

Educational Resources for Students and Science Labs

http://water.epa.gov/aboutow/owow/kids.cfm

Friends of the Los Angeles River

FriendsofLARiver

EPA Search Results for  Adopt a Watershed Group serving Los Angeles County

* Click on the watershed group organization name to access more information about the group or to update your group’s information in our database

92%

Group Name: Friends Of The Los Angeles River

Contact: Shelly Backlar
Contact Address: 570 W Ave 26, Ste 250
Los Angeles, California 90047
Contact Phone: 323-223-0585
Contact Email: contact@folar.org
URL: http://www.FoLAR.org
Activity:Education Project/Program
Description:Friends of the Los Angeles River is a non-profit organization founded in 1986 whose mission is to revitalize and protect the Los Angeles River – a living urban river system – through inclusive planning, education and wise stewardship.
Date Last Modified: 11/07/2011 10:49:55 AM


89%

Group Name: Council For Watershed Health

Contact: Deborah Glaser
Contact Address: 700 N. Alameda St.
Los Angeles, California 90012
Contact Phone: 2132299945
Contact Email: deborah@watershedhealth.org
URL: http://www.watershedhealth.org
Activity:Watershed Alliance/Council
Description:The Watershed Council supports a healthy watershed for the region by serving as a robust center for the generation of objective research and analysis. The Council has established a platform for meaningful collaboration between governmental organizations, academic institutions, businesses and other nonprofit organizations with a vested interest in preserving the watershed. Founded in 1995 by leading environmental activist Dorothy Green, the Watershed Council produces continuing research programs …MORE…
Number of Volunteers: 0
Date Last Modified: 02/27/2012 09:24:24 AM


87%

Group Name: El Rancho B.A.S.S. Fishing Organization

Contact: Louis Prieto
Contact Address: 9238 Myron St.
Pico Rivera, California 90660
Contact Phone: (562) 949-5426
Contact Email: erbassclub@excite.com
Activity:Restoration/Conservation Project
Description:El Rancho B.A.S.S. Fishing Organization is dedicated to improving the environment. We will help out with conservation programs to keep our waters clean and safe for the future. We want to establish new wildlife habitats and save the sport of fishing. We want to join community activities and hold fund-raising events for our community projects and needs. We are a premier fishing organization serving California. We serve the community, environment, research, academic programs related to our goals, …MORE…
Date Last Modified: 06/10/2008 08:14:43 AM


87%

Group Name: Arroyo Seco Foundation

Contact: Tim Brick
Contact Address: 539 East Villa Street
Pasadena, California 91101
Contact Phone: (626) 792-2442
Contact Email: tbrick@email.com
URL: http://www.arroyoseco.org
Activity:Restoration/Conservation Project
Description:The Arroyo Seco Foundation advocates an integrated, harmonious approach to watershed and flood management, water conservation, habitat enhancement as well as the expansion of recreational opportunities. Through action projects, recreation and environmental awareness activities, ASF strives to involve the residents and organizations in our region in protecting and restoring our watershed. Working with North East Trees, we have recently completed the Arroyo Seco Watershed Restoration Feasibilit…MORE…
Number of Volunteers: 200
Date Last Modified: 06/10/2008 08:14:27 AM


86%

Group Name: Two Yosemites

Contact: Peter Jacobsen
Contact Address: PO Box 712433
Los Angeles, California 90071
Contact Email: jacobsenp@delphi.com
Activity:Watershed Alliance/Council
Description:Restoration of Hetch Hetchy Valley(Tuolumne River, a tributary to the San Joaquin River) in Yosemite National Park.
Date Last Modified: 10/21/2008 10:27:34 AM


80%

Group Name: Santa Monica BayKeeper

Contact: Angie Bera
Contact Address: P.O. Box 10096
Marina del Rey, California 90295
Contact Phone: 310-305-9645
Contact Email: octopus@smbaykeeper.org
URL: http://www.smbaykeeper.org
Activity:Volunteer Monitoring
Description:Our citizen water quality monitoring program began in 1995. The program trains volunteers to visually monitor the over 300 storm drains that empty into the Santa Monica Bay. Data collected each month includes the physical appearance of the beach, the amount of debris near drains, and the diversity of wildlife. BeachKeepers currently monitor the entire 46 miles of coastline of the Santa Monica Bay, providing an early warning system that identifies toxins flowing from storm drains that could seri…MORE…
Number of Volunteers: 70
Date Last Modified: 06/10/2008 08:14:40 AM


77%

Group Name: Trout Unlimited – California

Contact: David Katz
Contact Address: 1120 College Avenue
Santa Rosa, California 95404
Contact Phone: (707)543-5877
Contact Email: dkatz@tu.org
URL: http://www.tucalifornia.org
Activity:Restoration/Conservation Project
Description:For over 35 years, Trout Unlimited has been America’s leading trout and salmon conservation organization, dedicated to conserving, protecting, and restoring cold-water fisheries and their watersheds. Whether they are planning and building stream improvement projects, working with government to secure fish-friendly legislation, or teaching young people the importance of protecting wild fish and their habitat, TU members are actively engaged in the fight to preserve our precious trout and salmon r…MORE…
Date Last Modified: 02/04/2009 01:36:12 PM


77%

Group Name: Trout Unlimited – California

Contact: Drew Irby
Contact Address: PO Box 3237
Santa Rosa, California 95402-3237
Contact Phone: 949-588-5458
URL: http://www.tucalifornia.org
Activity:Restoration/Conservation Project
Description:For over 35 years, Trout Unlimited has been America’s leading trout and salmon conservation organization, dedicated to conserving, protecting, and restoring cold-water fisheries and their watersheds. Whether they are planning and building stream improvement projects, working with government to secure fish-friendly legislation, or teaching young people the importance of protecting wild fish and their habitat, TU members are actively engaged in the fight to preserve our precious trout and salmon r…MORE…
Date Last Modified: 02/04/2009 01:24:03 PM


77%

Group Name: Trout Unlimited – California

Contact: David Katz
Contact Address: 1120 College Avenue
Santa Rosa, California 95404
Contact Phone: (707)543-5877
Contact Email: dkatz@tu.org
URL: http://www.tucalifornia.org
Activity:Restoration/Conservation Project
Description:For over 35 years, Trout Unlimited has been America’s leading trout and salmon conservation organization, dedicated to conserving, protecting, and restoring cold-water fisheries and their watersheds. Whether they are planning and building stream improvement projects, working with government to secure fish-friendly legislation, or teaching young people the importance of protecting wild fish and their habitat, TU members are actively engaged in the fight to preserve our precious trout and salmon r…MORE…
Date Last Modified: 02/04/2009 01:23:23 PM


77%

Group Name: Trout Unlimited – California

Contact: Drew Irby
Contact Address: PO Box 3237
Santa Rosa, California 95402-3237
Contact Phone: 949-588-5458
URL: http://www.tucalifornia.org
Activity:Restoration/Conservation Project
Description:For over 35 years, Trout Unlimited has been America’s leading trout and salmon conservation organization, dedicated to conserving, protecting, and restoring cold-water fisheries and their watersheds. Whether they are planning and building stream improvement projects, working with government to secure fish-friendly legislation, or teaching young people the importance of protecting wild fish and their habitat, TU members are actively engaged in the fight to preserve our precious trout and salmon r…MORE…
Date Last Modified: 02/04/2009 01:20:45 PM


76%

Group Name: Friends of the Los Angeles River RiverWatch

Contact: Joan Greenwood
Contact Address: 2091 San Francisco Ave.
Long Beach, California 90806
Contact Phone: 5625990812
Contact Email: Jvgreenwoo@aol.com
URL: http://www.folar.org
Activity:Volunteer Monitoring
Description:To monitor 60 sites along the entire length of the L.A. River for 12 months To survey biota and complete 3 seasonal reports To produce the first State of the Los Angeles River Report in April 2002
Number of Volunteers: 60 plus
Date Last Modified: 10/17/2008 05:30:33 PM

Speakers Dr. Jay Famiglietti, Tim Brick, Thomas Love, PE WaterDay2015, March 21st

Needed: 11 Trillion Gallons to Replenish
California Drought

 NASA JPL-LogoSGMWDlogo
JayFamiglietti  TomLoveGood

Dec. 16, 2014: It will take about 11 trillion gallons of water (42 cubic kilometers) — around 1.5 times the maximum volume of the largest U.S. reservoir — to recover from California’s continuing drought, according to a new analysis of NASA satellite data.

The finding was part of a sobering update on the state’s drought made possible by space and airborne measurements and presented by NASA scientists Dec. 16 at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco. Such data are giving scientists an unprecedented ability to identify key features of droughts, data that can be used to inform water management decisions.

A team of scientists led by Jay Famiglietti of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California used data from NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites to develop the first-ever calculation of this kind — the volume of water required to end an episode of drought.

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NASA satellite data reveal the severity of California’s drought on water resources across the state. This map shows the trend in water storage between September 2011 and September 2014. Image Credit: NASA JPL

Earlier this year, at the peak of California’s current three-year drought, the team found that water storage in the state’s Sacramento and San Joaquin river basins was 11 trillion gallons below normal seasonal levels. Data collected since the launch of GRACE in 2002 shows this deficit has increased steadily.

“Spaceborne and airborne measurements of Earth’s changing shape, surface height and gravity field now allow us to measure and analyze key features of droughts better than ever before, including determining precisely when they begin and end and what their magnitude is at any moment in time,” Famiglietti said. “That’s an incredible advance and something that would be impossible using only ground-based observations.”

GRACE data reveal that, since 2011, the Sacramento and San Joaquin river basins decreased in volume by four trillion gallons of water each year (15 cubic kilometers). That’s more water than California’s 38 million residents use each year for domestic and municipal purposes. About two-thirds of the loss is due to depletion of groundwater beneath California’s Central Valley.

Auroras Underfoot (signup)

In related results, early 2014 data from NASA’s Airborne Snow Observatory indicate that snowpack in California’s Sierra Nevada range was only half of previous estimates.

The observatory is providing the first-ever high-resolution observations of snow water volume in the Tuolumne River, Merced, Kings and Lakes basins of the Sierra Nevada and Uncompahgre watershed in the Upper Colorado River Basin.

To develop these calculations, the observatory measures how much water is in the snowpack and how much sunlight the snow absorbs, which influences how fast the snow melts. These data enable accurate estimates of how much water will flow out of a basin when the snow melts, which helps guide decision about reservoir filling and water allocation.

“The 2014 snowpack was one of the three lowest on record and the worst since 1977, when California’s population was half what it is now,” said Airborne Snow Observatory principal investigator Tom Painter of JPL. “Besides resulting in less snow water, the dramatic reduction in snow extent contributes to warming our climate by allowing the ground to absorb more sunlight. This reduces soil moisture, which makes it harder to get water from the snow into reservoirs once it does start snowing again.”

New drought maps show groundwater levels across the U.S. Southwest are in the lowest two to 10 percent since 1949. The maps, developed at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, combine GRACE data with other satellite observations.

“Integrating GRACE data with other satellite measurements provides a more holistic view of the impact of drought on water availability, including on groundwater resources, which are typically ignored in standard drought indices,” said Matt Rodell, chief of the Hydrological Sciences Laboratory at Goddard.

The scientists cautioned that while the recent California storms have been helpful in replenishing water resources, they aren’t nearly enough to end the multi-year drought.

“It takes years to get into a drought of this severity, and it will likely take many more big storms, and years, to crawl out of it,” said Famiglietti.

 

ABOUT OUR SPEAKERS

 

JayFamilgliettiCasual

Jay Famiglietti PhD is a hydrologist, a professor of Earth System Science and
of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California,
Irvine, and the Senior Water Scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion
Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology.  He is a member of
the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board.

Jay and his team have been researching and communicating about water and
climate change — in academics, in business, in government and to the
general public — for over 25 years.   He appeared as a featured expert on
60 Minutes and in the water documentary Last Call at the Oasis, and he is a
regular contributor to National Geographic Water Currents and to Huffington
Post.  Jay is a frequent speaker, and his research is often featured in the
international news media, including the New York Times, the Los Angeles
Times, The Economist, CNN, Al Jazeera, National Public Radio, BBC Radio and
others.

He is currently working on his first book on the global groundwater crisis.

TomLoveGood

Mr. Thomas A. Love is Vice President of D R Consultants & Designers, Inc. and a registered civil engineer with 30 years of experience in public agency, water resources and engineering management. Mr. Love has experience in all aspects of water resource management and capital program implementation including: planning; finance; grant funding; customer and stakeholder collaboration; and public and legislative outreach pertaining to all aspects of water / waste water resource management and program implementation. Mr. Love demonstrates a high level of competence and proven success in interfacing with communities and agencies, as well as consensus building with and between agencies on water resource planning and project implementation.
Mr. Love’s work experience with public agency governance and management brings a unique insight to the DRC family and clients.

Mr. Love is a major asset to DRC’s Municipal Service Division having served as General Manager and Executive Manager of Engineering for the Inland Empire Utilities Agency, a MWD member agency and sanitation district. Mr. Love also served as District Engineer for West and Central Basin Municipal Water Districts during the initial implementation of their Recycled Water Programs. Mr. Love holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Utah State University and is a Registered Civil Engineer in California.

Mom2014JoanRiback

Our Chairperson, Joan Riback

Joan Riback has served as an Organization and Community Development Consultant since 2001. She received training in Leveraging Skills for Municipalities’ Change Efforts in 2002 and was an invited participant in Leadership Training for a Sustainable Future in September, 2003 – May, 2004. As founding President of the Forestville Planning Association in Sonoma County, she served on a variety of committees working with water issues. Joan believes that water is the most important issue in the world today and is passionate about deepening that understanding within her community.

 

News and Teaching Resources

Video for students regarding Groundwater

GroundwaterVideo2

GroundwaterVideo
Play Groundwater video here:

http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/waterandland/groundwater/education/animation.aspx

 

NASA JPL-Logo  CADroughtMap

The current California drought represents a
11 trillion gallons of water  shortfall.”

CA News JPL

CNN http://www.cnn.com/2014/12/18/us/california-rains-and-drought/

NASA Science News Logo

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2014/16dec_drought/

CNN-News

One year of water left in California – Will you ration now?

Sierra-Madre-Water-Supply-8-29-2013-300x162    Rotary-Logo-SM  SantaAnitaDam

NEWS FLASH  MARCH 12, 2015

Op-Ed from the LA Times

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-famiglietti-drought-california-20150313-story.html   Read here…

Dear Sierra Club California Members and Friends,

Crossing dry Sandy Wool Lake near Milpitas. Credit: Don DeBold

Recent news about the dreary status of California’s drought, and the mixed response to it, has me wondering why more of us aren’t running down the street looking like the distraught character in painter Edvard Munch’s The Scream.

Water scientist Jay Famiglietti warned last week in a Los Angeles Times op-ed that NASA satellite data, combined with what we know about rapidly declining groundwater stores, shows that California has just about a year’s worth of water left. This is as we come to the close of the fourth dry winter in a row, with no end to the drought in sight.

Right now, Sierra snowpack water content is as low as ever recorded by the Department of Water Resources for this time of year. In some places, it is six percent—and less—of the average.

This grim news shouldn’t come as a surprise. Famiglietti warned that we’re rapidly approaching a waterless reality in a July op-ed, too.

What does come as a surprise is that the level of action to respond to the drought hasn’t been as focused or intense as the issue warrants.

On a positive note of action, the State Water Resources Control Board this week is expected to tell water agencies that they need to actively limit to two the number of days homeowners and commercial businesses can water their landscapes. This may seem like something that should have happened at least a year ago, but that it is happening at all is a good move.

On the other hand, the governor just spent some of his precious time working the system in Washington, DC to try to clear the way for his San Francisco Bay Delta tunnel project. And there is likely to be additional efforts by Congress to accelerate the tunnels or weaken other laws protecting the Delta.

Absolutely nothing about the tunnels project will help California’s drought. At best it would just dangerously delay the inevitable necessity to dramatically change the way we deal with water. It’s a distraction.

Our focus now needs to be on regional solutions to increase conservation and careful reuse and recycling. Huge infrastructure projects better suited to the Eisenhower era—the governor’s tunnels, some proposed dams—provide certain big engineering firms with fat public contracts. But they don’t solve or even rationally respond to the essential problem: We are in the fourth year of a drought driven by climate disruption. Drought is going to be a more frequent and more intense part of our existence, and so we need to permanently change the way we handle water in California permanently.

And that brings me back to the water scientist, Jay Famiglietti. The guy deserves a medal for speaking out clearly about the problem and offering solutions. In last week’s op-ed, he recommended four things that need to happen to address the drought: mandatory water rationing across sectors, accelerated implementation of the groundwater act passed last year, a task force of thought leaders to brainstorm better long-term water management in the state, and public ownership of the drought and water management issues.

Californians use about twice as much water per capita for residential use as Australians. The Australians weren’t always so thrifty. They had to entirely redo their approach to water as they trudged through a ten-year drought.

Many of the things the Australians did are consistent with Famiglietti’s four-point proposal. But we now know that we don’t have ten years to spare. Indeed, some communities in the state already don’t have drinking water.

If you are looking for ways to personally cut your water use, there are some great resources online. One of the best is produced by a consortium of Arizona communities. It lists nearly 200 things you can do to save water. California also has a water saver website with similar recommendations.

Personal responsibility is important. But, as Famiglietti’s list suggests, there are key policy shifts needed, too. So on your behalf, we’ll keep pressing here in Sacramento for those shifts.

We will continue to oppose the Bay Delta tunnels and any proposed dams.  We hired a new staff person who focuses on groundwater law implementation and other water issues.  And we’ll continue to educate and promote ways for everyone to conserve.

Sincerely,

Kathryn Phillips

Kathryn Phillips
Director

Sierra Club California is the Sacramento-based legislative and regulatory advocacy arm of the 13 California chapters of the Sierra Club.

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Education, Discussion, and Solutions for the whole community …
GardenswKids   la-1612769-me-adv-yellow-water-01-rrd-jpg-20131210

Video for students regarding Groundwater

GroundwaterVideo2

GroundwaterVideo
Play Groundwater video here:

http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/waterandland/groundwater/education/animation.aspx

 

NASA JPL-Logo  CADroughtMap

The current California drought represents a
11 trillion gallons of water  shortfall.”

CA News JPL

CNN http://www.cnn.com/2014/12/18/us/california-rains-and-drought/

NASA Science News Logo

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2014/16dec_drought/

CNN-News

PARTNERS:

The Rotary Club of Sierra Madre was founded in 1997 and is a community-based, volunteer organization with roots traced back to 1905 in Chicago where the  Rotary International club #1 was created by local business owners. Our purpose is to serve the communities in which we live and eradicate polio throughout the world. Since we are “this close” to achieving our original humanitarian goal, local Rotary Clubs are focused upon improving the lives of others at home and around the world with 32,000 active clubs and 1.2 million dedicated members. For more information regarding the Sierra Madre Rotary Club visit here.
http://rotaryclubofsierramadre.com/about/

headerlogo
The City of Sierra Madre accepted our proposal to partner with them and explore ways to educate residents, engage students, and conduct a community outreach program. Since we live and work in a region where water, our most precious natural resource, requires daily conservation and usage by millions of Angelenos in Southern California, we believe the public needs to know practical water saving tips and ways to preserve our quality of life for generations to come.

PipesMountainTrail WaterwiseOwlWater-tankstraditional-landscape la-1612769-me-adv-yellow-water-01-rrd-jpg-20131210 GardenswKids

Rotary-Logo-SM  TerryMiller-pump54 Sierra-Madre-740px-8-11-20141CADroughtMap

JayFamiglietti     Evelyn Reyes     TomLoveGood    Mom2014JoanRiback

WaterDayMap3-18

City Hall, Hart House and Memorial Park in Sierra Madre
City Hall, Hart House and Memorial Park in Sierra Madre

 

PERMITS SUBMITTED:
City of Sierra Madre
Temporary Use Permit submitted Nov 17, 2014 –
Approved Dec 2014

aerial-sierra_madreheaderlogo WaterwiseOwl

 

Water conservation – one drop at a time

  • Welcome to the World WaterDay 2015 web site. Our purpose is to educate the residents of Sierra Madre and invite residents of  the San Gabriel Valley how to conserve water, our most precious natural resource.

    See the link to the daily water production here  http://www.cityofsierramadre.com/water-conservation/daily-water-production

  • water_filter
    la-1612769-me-adv-yellow-water-01-rrd-jpg-20131210Map-SGVcm3435GardenswKidsaerial-sierra_madre Aerial view of the water spreading grounds above Sierra Madre.

Sierra-Madre-740px-8-11-20141

*INFORMATION FOR BOOTHS*
Set up begins at 7:30am and the event runs from 9am-5pm.  We have reserved a table and two chairs for many of you, and some of you have offered to bring your
own tables.  You will need a table cloth and shade.  Please see the
attached booth map for your location.  You can also check in at the Rotary
Booth when you arrive or call my cell: 626 773 2508.
You can pull into the Hart House driveway to unload.  There is parking in
the lots on the other side of Hermosa, behind the shops and the City Hall
parking lot.
I’m also attaching a press release with a schedule of the day’s events.
I’m hoping that you will send this out to your email list.  This is an
important event and we want to make sure that people know about it.  And
please encourage people to brush up on their water facts for the game
show:)   It promises to be a wonderful day!

Please call with questions or input.  I look forward to seeing you there.
Joan Riback
Event Coordinator
626 773 2508

WaterDayMap3-18

Hart Park House in Memorial Park, corner of Hermosa and Sierra Madre Blvd.
Hart Park House in Memorial Park, corner of Hermosa and Sierra Madre Blvd.

1. Hart House  – Lectures and demonstrations
2. Memorial Park – Central meeting place for booths and picnic area, bandshell, food vendors and schools

canon  

Lawn next to bandshell
Lawn next to bandshell

photo(2)
3. City Council Chambers – Location for panel discussions and best seating

HeasleyField-CityYards

4. Kensington Entrance to Gardens

photo

 

5. Tours of the City Yards behind Healsey Field and Sierra Madre Community Swimming Pool.
Water-tanks    AdamMatsumoto
“WaterDay 2015 – A community services sponsored event in conjunction with The Rotary Club of Sierra Madre. “